Emerging Infectious Diseases and Health Surveillance at U.S. Air Travel Ports of Entry: Perspective From Within the Department of Homeland Security
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How to Cite

Hickey, A., Wong, D. Y., Blessington, T., Grady, A., Lesniak, C., Cheeseman Barthel, S., Teper, S., Bilado, W., Henenfent, J., Garrett, T., Bonzagni, N., Freese, M., & Quitugua, T. (2016). Emerging Infectious Diseases and Health Surveillance at U.S. Air Travel Ports of Entry: Perspective From Within the Department of Homeland Security. Online Journal of Public Health Informatics, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v8i1.6475

Abstract

More than 150 U.S. international airports process an estimated two billion passengers and 50 million metric tons of cargo arriving in the U.S. from more than 1,000 international airports located outside the U.S. Entry and customs screening are points where travelers from international destinations pass; a logical location for assessing health of incoming travelers in order to identify and control import of diseases of emerging diseases. NBIC examined peer-reviewed literature, region-specific disease spectrum/frequency, and air travel patterns to assess options for ports of entry health screening as well as the challenges and potential benefits for active screening programs.

https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v8i1.6475
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