Immunization Registries in the EMR Era
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How to Cite

Stevens, L., Palma, J., Pandher, K., & Longhurst, C. (2013). Immunization Registries in the EMR Era. Online Journal of Public Health Informatics, 5(2). https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v5i2.4696

Abstract

Background:  The CDC established a national objective to create population-based tracking of immunizations through regional and statewide registries nearly 2 decades ago, and these registries have increased coverage rates and reduced duplicate immunizations. With increased adoption of commercial electronic medical records (EMR), some institutions have used unidirectional links to send immunization data to designated registries. However, access to these registries within a vendor EMR has not been previously reported.

Purpose: To develop a visually integrated interface between an EMR and a statewide immunization registry at a previously non-reporting hospital, and to assess subsequent changes in provider use and satisfaction.

Methods: A group of healthcare providers were surveyed before and after implementation of the new interface. The surveys addressed access of the California Immunization Registry (CAIR), and satisfaction with the availability of immunization information. Information Technology (IT) teams developed a “smart-link” within the electronic patient chart that provides a single-click interface for visual integration of data within the CAIR database.

Results: Use of the tool has increased in the months since its initiation, and over 20,000 new immunizations have been exported successfully to CAIR since the hospital began sharing data with the registry. Survey data suggest that providers find this tool improves workflow and overall satisfaction with availability of immunization data. (p=0.009).

Conclusions: Visual integration of external registries into a vendor EMR system is feasible and improves provider satisfaction and registry reporting.

https://doi.org/10.5210/ojphi.v5i2.4696
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